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Outdoors Classifieds

Outdoors Classifieds
about a year ago
2017-10-23 09:12:05

Outdoors Classifieds

Outdoors Classifieds
about a year ago
2017-10-23 09:12:42

Time and time again people are challenged with the question "What type of scope should I get for my rifle?" There are a number of factors to think about before coming to a final decision.

Firstly, we must consider the ideal amount of magnification for the job the scope will be performing. Typically, 3-9x40 is a very common combination of zoom and objective lens diameter for shooting up to 200 yards. What we mean by this is that the 3-9 means the scope can range from 3 times zoom to 9 times zoom while the 40 represents a 40mm objective lens.  Having a good lower end zoom such as 3 will be beneficial to those who do close range hunting.

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Outdoors Classifieds

Outdoors Classifieds
about a year ago
2017-10-23 09:13:11

"Okay, but what if I want more zoom?"

This is where you can start looking at the next tier of zoom combinations. Typically you will find scopes that are 4-12x44, 4-16x50 etc. As before this means 4-12 times zoom by a 44mm objective lens.

*** The bigger the objective lens, the more light your scope will let in***

"I understand the zoom and objective lens diameter thing, now what?"

Next thing to think about when buying a scope is parallax adjustment. Parallax adjustment allows for the shooter to make an extra adjustment to focus the target in the same focal plane as their eye and the reticle leading to increased accuracy. Most scopes are factory calibrated to have a parallax adjustment fixed at around 150 yards. Scopes with higher magnifications typically have parallax adjustment either side or objective mounted and they are a useful tool to have.

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Outdoors Classifieds

Outdoors Classifieds
about a year ago
2017-10-23 09:14:19


"Great! So now I am ready to buy a scope?"

Not quite. Another thing to consider when buying a rifle scope is the tube construction. Most hunting rifle scopes are 1 inch in diameter. Higher end rifle scopes are offered in 30mm and 34mm. The difference between diameters again comes down to light transmission. Although a bigger diameter scope tube will be heavier, it will let in more light. This typically means better light transmission.

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Outdoors Classifieds

Outdoors Classifieds
about a year ago
2017-10-23 09:14:41

"Anything else?"

You bet, next we need to consider what style of shooting we are going to be doing to best suit our needs. If the shooter is going to be doing a lot of long range precision type shooting, there are two possible scenarios. The shooter will either use their reticle to compensate for the distance by moving down on the target dots or they will dope their rifle scope. By this we mean they will make their adjustments by dialing their reticle. This comes into play when deciding if you want to buy a scope that has externally adjustable turrets. If they are externally adjustable, it makes for easier adjustments to you scope (doping) instead of having to remove the caps to make your shot. Capped turrets are a good idea if you are going to be breaking trail through the bush a lot. This way your scope wont get adjusted without you knowing.

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Outdoors Classifieds

Outdoors Classifieds
about a year ago
2017-10-23 09:14:59


Lastly, when it comes to buying a scope take your time when looking through it. Note the clarity of the glass, go through the motions of zooming the scope all the way up to max power and back down again, make sure it is clear edge to edge for the whole range.

In closing, there are a lot of variables that come into play when deciding on the right scope for your style of shooting. In any aspect, you get what you pay for. Spend a little bit of extra money on the scope you really feel will be the best fit and you won't need to upgrade. Buy once, cry once. Cheers!

Remember this checklist when buying a scope:

1. What type of zoom do I need?
2. What size of objective should I consider?
3. Do I want parallax adjustment?
4. What size tube should I consider?
5. Do I want a bullet drop reticle?
6. Do I want adjustable turrets?
7. Check the clarity!

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